Learning Creative Learning

Next week Mitch Resnick and the folks at the MIT Media Lab are kicking off another round of their terrific online course and community: Learning Creative Learning. I have already signed up and am excited to be joining other creative people around the world in this great learning and sharing community.

Read the summary below and click here to register.


“For many years, the Lifelong Kindergarten group at the MIT Media Lab, led byMitch Resnick, has been developing new technologies, activities, and environments (such as Scratch and Computer Clubhouses) to engage all children, from all backgrounds, in creative learning experiences.

Learning Creative Learning (LCL) is our effort to connect and share ideas with people around the world with similar goals, visions, and values. It is an opportunity for like-minded educators and learners to meet one another and share ideas, strategies, and practical tips on how to support creative learning.

LCL is organized as a six-week online course (starting on October 18, 2017), but its real goal is to cultivate an ongoing learning community in support of creative learning around the world.

Each week we will offer online videos, readings, and hands-on activities. You’ll be able go through this material at your own pace. All of our materials will be freely available (including sections from Mitch Resnick’s new Lifelong Kindergarten book). You can spend as much or as little time you like — by watching, reading, making, sharing, reflecting, and discussing.”

Scratch and Friends

logo

Scratch, the drag-and-drop visual programming language from MIT, continues to grow in popularity among teachers and students. The statistics tracker on the Scratch website shows:

  • 18,688,109 projects shared,
  • 15,314,275 users registered,
  • 97,400,962 comments posted,
  • 3,069,067 studios created

Students are creating, sharing, and remixing Scratch projects…and universities are remixing Scratch itself, building and sharing new flavors of Scratch to further expand the appeal and application of Scratch for programming.

Scratch | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

If you are looking for the original Scratch (now in v.2) this is the place for you. Create an account and begin coding games, simulations, musical instruments, and more!

Snap | University of California, Berkeley

Snap is for more advanced users who want to add their own blocks to Scratch. Built on Scratch v.1.4, Snap projects are also exportable as stand-alone apps for Windows and Mac.

animated-tree

Scribble | Monash University

Artists will appreciate this customization of Scratch (via Snap) that comes pre-loaded with cool red blocks for shapes, transparency and text.

shapes

No matter your students’ interests or experience levels, there is a Scratch flavor that is just right for them. Try them out and let me know what you think in the comments below!

ECIS TID Committee Blog | At the Intersection of Language, Culture, and Code

Please read my latest post on the ECIS TID Committee blog:

Source: ECIS TID Committee Blog | At the Intersection of Language, Culture, and Code

MAKE | Access Android Sensors from a Scratch Program

Now this is doubly exciting: an Android app that uses your phone’s sensors to send input to Scratch. Two of my favorite things (Scratch and Android) coming together.

I have already watch the video clip (see above) and downloaded the app itself onto my Nexus One. Tomorrow I will try it out at school with the kids to see how it goes.

It remains to be seen what exactly can be done with this additional Scratch input, of course. Would it make your phone into a game controller or scientific probe? Would it give you robotics, remote control-style interactions with Scratch?

I will post again on this topic when I have had the opportunity to explore this one further.

MAKE | Access Android Sensors from a Scratch Program.

 Scratch Sensor – the Android Smartphone as a DAQ module

 Scratch Sensor in the Android Market